Takata air bag blamed for death during fix job

Robyn Ryan
July 12, 2017

It is the first death to involve a person who was not involved in a auto accident.

NHTSA estimates that Honda has fixed almost 60 percent of all the recalled airbags within its own and Acura vehicles - but that still leaves millions of inflators needing a fix. It's worth noting that The Associated Press cites Honda spokesperson Chris Martin, who said "The rupture most likely contributed to his death". The company would not release the man's name.

"For years now, Takata has told the public that their line of air bag inflators with moisture absorbent was safe".

Honda said the vehicle's registered owners had received at least 12 recall notices but never got recommended repairs. It's also not clear why the air bag deployed, but police photos show the metal driver's side inflator ruptured and shot out fragments, Honda said.

Takata Corp.'s air bag inflators can explode with too much force, hurling shrapnel into drivers and passengers.

Takata has recalled, or expects to recall, by 2019 about 125 million vehicles worldwide, including more than 60 million in the US.

The recall, which comes in addition to the 42 million inflators Takata previously recalled, covers airbag inflators made from 2005 to 2012 and used in certain Nissan, Mazda, and Ford vehicles. "That's why government regulators need to step up the pace of figuring out whether all remaining Takata airbag inflators are safe". The car's ignition switch was on, so the air bag would have been ready in case of a crash, according to Honda. The Accord in question was one of more than 300,000 un-repaired Honda vehicles still on the road equipped with the defective airbag inflators. The incident occurred in Hialeah, Florida. Those models are the 2001 and 2002 Accord and Civic, the 2002 CR-V and Odyssey, the 2002 and 2003 Acura 3.2 TL, the 2003 Acura 3.2 CL and the 2003 Pilot.

Of the deaths linked to Takata's inflators, 16 took place in Honda vehicles since May 2009, including five in Malaysia using a different type of Takata inflator, while one death occurred in a Ford Motor Co vehicle in SC in December 2015.

Scott Caudill, chief operating officer of TK Holdings, Takata's United States unit, said in a court affidavit last month in its bankruptcy filing that the company "faces insurmountable claims" relating to the recalls and owes billions of dollars to automakers.

"On average, more than 500 recalled Honda and Acura vehicles are receiving estimates and triggering notifications through this system every day", Honda wrote.

Last month, Takata filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy listing liabilities of over 10-billion dollars.

Other reports by VideoGamingPros

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