North Korea hackers stole South Korea-US war plans: Lawmaker

Geneva Matthews
October 12, 2017

The hackers broke into the computer networks of South Korea's defense ministry past year and pilfered classified military documents that detailed military operations in case war broke out on the Korean peninsula, South Korea's state news agency Yonhap reported.

North Korean hackers have a history of stirring up trouble, as they have been at it for years.

The United States, meanwhile, staged another show of force meant to deter any North Korean aggression by flying two B-1B supersonic bombers Tuesday night from an air base in the USA territory of Guam to the South for drills with South Korean fighter jets. In August, Pyongyang threatened to shoot intermediate range missiles towards the vicinity of Guam, a target frequently subjected to sabre-rattling from the North.

If confirmed, the reported hacking attack by the North would be a major blow for South Korea at a time when its relations with rival North Korea are at a low point.

Gen. John Hyten, head of U.S. Strategic Command, has stated that the EMP threat is real, but the military appears more focused on North Korea's ballistic missiles and nuclear warheads.

Rhee, now a member of the National Assembly's committee for national defence, said about 80 percent of the hacked data has not yet been identified, but that none of the information was expected to have compromised the South Korean military as it was not top classified intelligence. -South Korean wartime "decapitation strike" plans against the North, according to South Korean media reports.

Vice Foreign Minister Lim Sung-nam will hold strategic talks with visiting U.S. Deputy Secretary of State John Sullivan on October 18 in Seoul, according to Seoul's foreign ministry. The South Korean defence ministry has so far refused to comment on the breach, which reportedly dates back to last September. Such missions have been conducted immediately after the provocations, but more recently as stand-alone events to demonstrate to North Korea U.S. military capabilities that would counter a North Korean military threat.

While North Korea was not able to hack USA power companies, there are concerns among some of observers that the regime may attempt to damage the power grid by detonating a nuclear device at a high altitude above the US, triggering an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). Pyongyang belatedly responded by relocating some of its military aircraft to its east coast, the National Intelligence Service then said.

Seoul's Joint Chiefs of Staff revealed Wednesday morning the bombers entered Korean air space before 9 p.m. after flying over from their base in Guam and did not leave until about 11.30 p.m.

Other reports by VideoGamingPros

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