Tomorrow - We will see the supermoon for the first time in 2017

Tomas Mccoy
December 3, 2017

That means that this will be a Super Frost Moon! "Sometimes during the year we get an opportunity to see the full moon when it is at its closest point and that's what we'll be seeing on December 3".

According to www.nasa.gov, "A supermoon is a moon that is full when it is also at or near its closest point in its orbit around Earth". When the moon is passing close to the earth, is is called "perigee".

Each month the moon rotates around the earth in an ellipse rather than a flawless circle. Far passes are called "apogee". When a full moon is closer to our planet, the tide levels are often higher.

The moon will be visible to see on Sunday after 5 p.m. when it begins to rise, however, it won't officially be a Supermoon until it is at its closest point to Earth, which will be at approximately 4 a.m. on Monday.

It'll be almost full Saturday night with clear skies for viewing.

For the Supermoon can be observed on 3 December from 19:00 Kyiv time.

An aircraft taking off from Ronald Reagan National Airport is seen passing in front of the Moon as it rises Sunday Dec. 3 2017 in Washington D.C
An aircraft taking off from Ronald Reagan National Airport is seen passing in front of the Moon as it rises Sunday Dec. 3 2017 in Washington D.C

While the moon is undoubtedly both bigger and brighter than usual, our eyes tend to trick us into seeing the moon as larger than it truly is.

If you miss this year's supermoon, don't worry.

Or, you know-you could just look out your window.

A supermoon is also believed to have an impact on the Earth's waters.

An image of the moon taken by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is shown in two halves to illustrate the difference between the apparent size of a supermoon (left) and a "micromoon" (right). "But it's another great chance to watch the Moon". On the three dates marked, step out into the moonset or moonrise and look up for a trilogy of sky watching treats!

While the supermoon can come out looking larger in photos (thanks to long lenses and editing) than it does when looking at it in person, Nichols says it is an incredible opportunity to get people interested in science and astronomy.

Other reports by VideoGamingPros

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